Carole James Introduces Campaign Finance Reform Bill

This will be interesting to watch; New Democrat Leader Carole James has tabled a campaign finance reform bill that would change the way B.C.’s political parties are financed. The key change? Only citizens will be able to contribute to political parties. And that means that unions and corporations cannot contribute.

“We have the opportunity to make British Columbia a leader in democratic reform, to rebuild public faith and public confidence in institutions of government. These campaign finance reforms are key to B.C.’s democratic renewal,” said James.

The NDP are often accused of being controlled by the unions that contribute to their political campaigns. So if the NDP are proposing campaign finance reform that would eliminate the contributions that unions make to the NDP, would you not just assume that the BC Liberals would welcome that opportunity? After all, that would get big labour out of the political process.

Of course the other part of the campaign finance reform bill that NDP leader Carole James has introduced would eliminate the contributions that big business can make to political parties. This side of things might not sit so well with the BC Liberals, after all, business groups (and lawyers who get to be appointed Special Prosecutors) tend to be pretty generous to the BC Liberal cause.

Funny how it is rarely a concern that the BC Liberals might be beholden to or controlled by the business groups who contribute to their political campaigns.

It will be fun to see just how much traction this private members’ bill receives in the BC Liberal controlled legislature.

4 thoughts on “Carole James Introduces Campaign Finance Reform Bill

  1. Kevin Dale McKeown

    “Funny how it is rarely a concern that the BC Liberals might be beholden to or controlled by the business groups who contribute to their political campaigns.”

    Are you serious? We never stop yammering on about how big business owns the Liberals and big unions own the NDP. Both have been a constant concern for the 45 years I’ve been aware of the public discourse in this province. Is the Left Coast writer willfully deaf?

  2. theleftcoast.ca Post author

    Let me clarify; the BC Liberals do not see it as a concern. Others see it as a concern but the BC Liberals appear to be quite comfortable with their relationship with the business community.

    The real proof will be how much traction this private members’ bill gets in the legislature. If it is dismissed by the ruling Libs, then that would indicate that they are comfortable with the status quo.

  3. thatsawrap

    The BC Liberals continually have used NDP support by the ‘Big Bad Unions’ as an effective political weapon. It is simplistic, but it works.

    Liberal support, on the other hand, is painted by them as the democratic right of each citizen (and his/her company) to contribute individually to a cause.

    Why would the Liberals give up this effective political tactic?

    Of course they are comfortable with it.

  4. WendiG

    It’s a pity that Carole James cannot absorb the techniques of fighting a political battle for the hearts aqnd minds of the voters…
    There are a few things in this Province that the sheeple believe without question…that every civic strike is a ‘garbage’ strike, because the media has called all civic strikes by this simplistic titile since time immemorial;
    The NDP are financed by Big Unions…which are involved in chump change compared to the multi-nationals that bankroll the Right…such as owners of newspapers…
    Instead of dealing with the issues that really matter to voters, such as the lies that the gLibs have repeated ad nauseum re the BC Rail issue, the HST, the homeless situation, jobs, health and education, Ms. James yet again snatches defeat from the jaws of victory by harping on something that no one cares to hear right now, and certainly will get little or no play in the monopomedia in BC…
    Is it any wonder that the NDP can gain little traction in this Province…I’m sorry to agree with many commentators who say that the time has come and gone for a leadership review…

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